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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 38-44

Changes in exercise capacity and psychosocial factors in hospitalized cardiac surgery patients


1 Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kobe University Hospital; Department of International Health, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe, Japan
2 Department of International Health, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe, Japan
3 Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
5 Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kobe University Hospital; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
6 Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Japan
7 Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kazuhiro P Izawa
Department of International Health, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2, Tomogaoka, Suma-Ku, Kobe, Hyogo 654-0142,
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/rcm.rcm_22_17

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Background: After cardiac valve surgery, postoperative exercise capacity and psychosocial parameters of patients change significantly and both affect prognosis. This study aimed to analyze and clarify the relationship between changes in perioperative exercise capacity and psychosocial factors in the early phase after valvular surgery. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 48 consecutive patients who underwent valvular surgery and studied their exercise capacity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), anxiety disorders, depression symptoms, blood samples, and echocardiograms preoperatively and 14-day postoperatively. Results: At the preoperative evaluation, the peak maximal oxygen consumption was 17.7 ± 5.9 ml/kg/min and decreased by 14.3 ± 4.4 ml/kg/min after the surgery (P < 0.0001). With regard to the HRQOL, the physical component summary (PCS) score and the role component summary scores decreased significantly after surgery (P < 0.05 for each). However, the mental component summary score increased significantly after surgery (51.9 ± 11.6 to 55.2 ± 10.4; P = 0.04). The ratios of the above the cut-off value for postoperative anxiety and depression scores were 29.1%, and 43.7%, respectively. Postoperative changes in exercise capacity were associated with variations in right ventricular function, chronotropic response during exercise, and the PCS score (P < 0.05 for each). Conclusions: Exercise capacity was reduced approximately 20% during the postoperative period in patients who underwent valvular surgery, and changes in exercise capacity were related to changes in psychosocial factors, not only cardiac functions. Therefore, it is important to evaluate not only perioperative exercise capacity but also psychosocial indicators during postoperative cardiac rehabilitation programs.


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